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Peth (Kothaligad) FortHeight : 3100 ft.
Type : Hill forts Fort Range : Karjat
District : Raigad Grade : Medium
      Peth, also known as ‘Kothaligad’, is situated in Shahapur Taluka, approximately 21Km North East of Karjat. This fort stands tall in the company of various other forts like Rajmachi, Dhak, Siddhagad and Bhimashankar, a witness to our illustrious history.

Kothaligad is more commonly known as the fort of Peth because the village of Peth is situated at its base. This fort though small in stature has a vast historical background. Mughal chronicles provide us a lot of information on this fort. This fort was more of a ‘defense station’ than a strong fort. Peth was mainly used for ammunition storage. Peth gained importance during Sambhaji’s era.
3 Photos available for this fort
Peth (Kothaligad)
History :
      Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb ordered his warriors ‘Abdul Kadar’ and ‘Ali Biradarkani’ in November 1684 to capture the forts belonging to Sambhaji’s empire. Abdul Kadar had a fair idea of importance of possession of this fort. Control over fort means control over Kokan region. He made a concrete plan to conquer the fort. In his efforts, he went in the surrounding region and kept people thereof as his servants to get inside information from them. As soon as he came to know that arms and weapons were traded here, his group of 300 gunmen reached the base in November 1684. The Marathas forced most of them back, but some still managed to reach the ‘Magarkot Dwar’ and started shouting ‘open the door’. The Marathas inside the fort opened the door on the assumption that these shouting Mughals were ‘own men’ who came for picking up the weapons for war. The Mughals immediately rushed in and the battle started. They could win the battle with help of ‘Mankoji Pandhere’.

The next day, the Marathas surrounded the fort. Abdul Kadar’s position became critical. The ammunition in the fort was destroyed and used in the battle. Although the Mughals were occupying the fort, they were helpless as the Marathas looted ammunition and food sent to them at their base camp, on its way. About 10-12 days later, Abdul Aziz Khan sent his son Abdul Khan to help Abdul Kadar. But Maratha Sardar Naroji Tryambak was hiding in the valley to prevent him to approach the fort. When another war broke, the Marathas lost and Naroji was killed. Ehmat Khan capitulated Naroji and hung his head right in the middle of the road. Now, the Mughals had total control over the fort. The Golden keys of main door of the fort were sent to Aurangzeb as a symbol of victory. After confirming the victory, he rewarded Abdul Khan. The Mughals renamed the fort as ‘Miftahulfateh’, meaning victory key.

The Marathas continued their efforts to conquer the fort. In December 1684, the Marathas tried to stop Mughals moving towards the fort. Seven thousand Marathas constituted a strong battalion and fought with Mahamatkhan. But success was far away. In April 1685, 700 Marathas attacked again. About 200 of them climbed the fort with the help of rope ladders. Battle started between two parties and a lot of blood shaded. The goddess of victory again favored the Mughals and the Marathas lost the battle and the fort.

After 130 years in November 1817, Bapurao, a Maratha Sardar with Bajirao II fought with British and won the fort.
Geography :
      One has to board ST bus for Ambivali via Kashele or from Karjat railway station on Mumbai-Pune route. The distance from Karjat to Ambivali is about 30 Kms. A road leads to village Peth from Ambivali. A tiring pathway leads to the fort door from village Peth. The pathway pierces through lush green trees and we can refresh ourselves with the lovingly smelled flowers and tasty fruits.
On can get down at Neral, another railway station on Mumbai-Pune route and reach Kashele by local conveyance and catch bus for Ambivali from there.
Fascinating Spots :

      The pinnacle of the Peth can be seen from the village. It looks like a filed surface. On reaching the top of the fort, we see caves carved in huge rocks. The first one is the cave of Goddess, besides which is a water cistern and the last one is the specious Bhairoba cave. A flat floor and well-sculpted pillars are specialty of the cave. Along the Bhairoba cave, steps are carved leading the pinnacle.

Four –Five potholes and some canon balls are scattered in the fort. Kalwawantinicha Mahal, Nagfani, Siddhagad, Malanggad, Chanderi, Prabalgad, Manikgad, and Matheran all these surrounding historical places are visible from top of the fort Peth.
Ways To Reach :
      One has to board ST bus for Ambivali via Kashele or from Karjat railway station on Mumbai-Pune route. The distance from Karjat to Ambivali is about 30 Kms. A road leads to village Peth from Ambivali. A tiring pathway leads to the fort door from village Peth. The pathway pierces through lush green trees and we can refresh ourselves with the lovingly smelled flowers and tasty fruits.
On can get down at Neral, another railway station on Mumbai-Pune route and reach Kashele by local conveyance and catch bus for Ambivali from there.
Ambivali to Peth – 2 hours
Peth village to top of the fort – 1 hour
Accommodation Facility :
      The cave on the fort is the best place to spend a night.
Drinking Water Facility :
      There are many a cisterns and tanks on the fort, but the one near the cave is reliable.
Time To Reach :
      45 minutes from the base village.
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