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Gavilgad FortHeight : 3600
Type : Hill forts Fort Range : Satpuda(Melghat)
District : Amravati Grade : Medium
      Gavilgad: the fort of Gavilgad took its name from the pastoral Gavlis centuries ago. They have deserted the fort. now. There are no inhabitants save the occasional visits of a panther or two and the herds of cattle who come to drink water from the tanks which once supplied water to a stately court and a strong garrison. Even to-day two tanks are in good condition but they are heavily silted and there is an abundance of shrub growth inside them which has rendered the waters putrid and useless for drinking. The tanks are known as Devatalav and Khantalav. In the monsoon the water overflows in a torrent down the precipitous hill side. The durbar steps on which princes had held audience are a favourite resort for picnic from Cikhaldara in the hot weather, the great banyan tree which has spread its boughs across them affording a delightful shade; while another class of sightseers has scribbled its names on the walls of the lesser mosque. The Archaeological department has concluded that it is impossible to do anything to restore the ruins; and though money is spent from time to time in removing rank vegetation from the walls, they are bound, as years pass by, to lapse into greater decay.

40 Photos available for this fort
Gavilgad
Gavilgad
Gavilgad
History :
      The fort takes its name from the Gawli (cow herds) who inhabited the Berar (modern day Amravati) for centuries. Earlier the fort was likely just made of mud as were several such areas in the region. The exact date of construction is not known but the Persian historian, Firishta, records that Ahmed Shah Wali, the ninth king of the Muzaffarid dynasty built Gawilgarh when he was encamped at Ellichpur in 1425. Likely this was the date when major fortification was carried out.

In 1803 during the 2nd Maratha War the fort was besieged by Arthur Wellesley (later Duke of Wellington).[3] After two failed attempts at the main gate by British and Sepoy companies, and many casualties, Captain Campbell led the 94th Scottish Brigade (light company) up the ravine dividing the inner and outer forts and into the inner fort by escalade. The Scots then forced the northern gatehouse and opened the many gates, allowing the remaining British forces entry. The British suffered few casualties in the final assault (approx. 150). The fortress was returned to the Marathas after making peace with the British but they abandoned it.
Fascinating Spots :

Ways To Reach :
      Chikhaldara is a hill station in Amaravati district. Reach Badnera on the Mumbai-Nagpur railway line and further to Amaravati. There are regular buses available from Amaravati to Partavda which is at 50 kms. Chikhaldara is 35 kms from here and can be reached by buses and other public transport.
Accommodation Facility :
      Available in Chikhaldara
Food Facility :
      Available in Chikhaldara. As the fort is huge it is recommended to carry food along.
Drinking Water Facility :
      Carry water along even though the lake inside the fort has water.
Time To Reach :
      The Parkot entrance of the fort is 3 kms from Ch
Best Season To Visit :
      November to February
Notes :
      1) As the fort is very huge it is advised to cover in 2 days span. On the first day visit the tourist attraction in Chikhaldhara and the outer part of the fort which takes around 2 hours. On the second day visit the entire fort in 4-5 hours’ time.

2) It is advised to carry a map of the fort along to help cover the entire fort.
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Forts starting with: G
 Gadgada (Ghargad)  Gagangad  Galna  Gambhirgad
 Gandharvgad  Gavilgad  Ghangad  Gharapuri
 Ghodbunder Fort  Ghosalgad  Goa Fort  Gopalgad
 Gorakhgad  Gorakhgad(Manmad)  Gowalkot